Collaborative Learning

 

The book excerpt, “Promoting Collaborative Learning” by Paloff and Pratt (2007) presents many positives associated with group collaboration and learning.  Specifically, group collaboration “helps learners achieve a deeper level of knowledge generation while moving from independence to interdependence, thus strengthening the foundation of the online learning community” (p. 157).  Further, “students have the opportunity to extend and deepen their learning experience, test out new ideas by sharing them with a supportive group, and receive critical and constructive feedback” (p. 158.).

Reflect on the many different types of groups to which you belong: academic, professional, hobby, religious, family.  Were there particular techniques or strategies of collaboration that aided in successful undertakings within those groups?  For instance, planning a family reunion or arranging a church fund raiser?  As you have learned, there are many different roles operating within groups.  Do you tend to play the same role in each group, or different roles in different groups?  Why?   

Instructions for the post

After reflecting on your previous group experiences and the various roles you played within them, please share with the class at least two techniques you found most successful and why.  Also, please share at least one strategy that did not work out so well.  Why do you think they were not as successful?  Which roles did you find yourself playing?  How did your role affect the outcome of the group’s task? Why?   

Please refer to the learning resources to support your responses.

 

Quality of Work Submitted

A: Exemplary

A =  4.00;

A- = 3.75

B: Graduate Level

B+  =  3.50;

B  =  3.00;

B-  =  2.75

C: Minimal Work

C+  = 2.50;

C = 2.00;

C- = 1.75

F:  Submitted but Unacceptable

F = 1.00

Content Includes all required content: two successful techniques; one unsuccessful strategy; explanations; roles played and pertinent details. Includes most of the majority of the required content: two successful techniques; one unsuccessful strategy; explanations; roles played and pertinent details. Includes some required content: two successful techniques; one unsuccessful strategy; explanations; roles played and pertinent details. Assignment is missing the majority of the required content.
Critical Analysis of Issues  Demonstrates critical thinking to analyze and relate key points.Supports content with required readings or course materials, and may use creditable sources in addition to those materials. Relates to the assigned discussion topic with satisfactory evidence of critical thinking.  Summarizes and supports content using information from required readings and course materials. Summarizes or restates discussion topic components with minimal evidence of critical thinking skills.Post is off topic.Post has minimal or no connection to course materials. Does not relate to the assigned discussion topic.Post does not summarize or contain a connection to required readings or course materials. 

 

Contribution to the Learning Community The student’s contribution meets all assigned criteria and frequently prompts further discussion of a topic.The student takes a leadership role in discussions.Regularly contributes to collaborative learning.

The student demonstrates exemplary awareness of the community’s needs.

The student’s contribution satisfactorily meets the assigned criteria for contributions to the discussions. The student interacts frequently and encourages others in the community.The student demonstrates an awareness of the community’s needs. The student’s contribution is minimal to the posting and response deadlines. Occasionally, the student makes an additional comment. The student makes minimal effort to become involved within the community. The student’s contribution does not meet the assigned criteria The student does not respond or responds late to postings.The student does not make an effort to participate in the community as it develops.
Responses:Quality of Learning for Colleagues and Self  Exceeded the minimum required postings and continued to follow up in ongoing discussions.Provide specific, constructive, and supportive feedback to extend colleagues’ thinking. Encourage continued and deeper discussion.

Offer additional resources or experiences.

Demonstrate exemplary evidence of personal learning as a result of interaction with colleagues.

Exceeded the minimum required postings.Provide constructive and supportive feedback to colleagues.Refer to sources from required readings and course materials.

Demonstrate satisfactory evidence of personal learning as a result of interaction with colleagues.

Made at least the requisite number of minimal response posts.Provide general feedback with minimal or no connection to required readings or course materials. Demonstrate minimal evidence of personal learning as a result of interaction with colleagues. Did not make the requisite minimum number of response posts.Provide agreement without substance or connection to required readings or course materials. Demonstrate no evidence of personal learning as a result of interaction with colleagues.
Expression Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas effectively written in Standard Edited English. Includes appropriate APA-formatted citations and reference list for outside sources and direct quotes.  Provides clear opinions and ideas written in Standard Edited English. Includes satisfactory APA-formatted citations and reference list for outside sources and direct quotes. Expression is unclear or interrupted by errors. Includes minimal or no APA-formatted citations and reference list for outside sources and direct quotes. Unacceptable written expression. May include outside sources and direct quotes that lack appropriate citations. 
Final Grade

A: Exemplary

B: Graduate Level C: Minimal Work F: Submitted but Unacceptable

Comments:

 

 

 

 

 

 References

Palloff, R., & Pratt, K. (2007). Building online communities: Effective strategies for the virtual classroom. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Advertisements

11 thoughts on “Collaborative Learning

  1. Pingback: My Homepage

  2. Collaborative Learning
    In the many different collaborative efforts I have been a part of it seems that the shared goal is the most important component. Palloff and Pratt (2007) noted “an important element of community, whether it is face-to-face or online, is the development of shared goals” (p. 159). The first technique that I use in a collaborative environment is sitting down or discussing with all members what the ultimate goal of the collaborative learning is. Once we have the goal, I then like to create a task list so that we know what we need to do to accomplish that goal.
    Another technique I have used to successfully complete a collaborative project is have clearly defined roles for each member of the team. With each team member having a specific role to complete it makes the task easier to complete. However, some times this backfires because a team member does not complete their role on time or at all.
    In an online learning environment I experienced one technique for collaborative learning that did not work at all. There were six of us on a collaborative project and we scheduled an online video conference. First the software didn’t work appropriate and then only two of the six people attended the online meeting. It was incredibly difficult to determine roles when only two members were present. Everyone had agreed to meet but because we were all in different time zones and places when it came to the actual conference call most people had something come up that they felt was more important.
    Jenn
    Reference
    Palloff, R., & Pratt, K. (2007). Building online communities: Effective strategies for the virtual classroom. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

    • Jenn,

      Your description of positive group collaboration rings true. So does your negative incident. Online learning creates makes some aspects of collaboration richer and easier. For instance, collaborating on a course-long project using wikispace. On the other hand, as you mentioned, time zone issues, as well as different goals can wreak havoc on a group project. If half the team does not believe a group real-time meeting is necessary there is no way to enforce it.

      Blessings,
      Lynn

  3. Hi Lynn,
    I love your question. There are many roles that each student should be able to do when involved with a collaborative project. I have had the opportunity to work in many different types of collaborative projects such as: professional learning communities, group projects, and have facilitated these groups in my class. I believe the fundamental basis for cooperative groups to succeed is respect for all team members. According to Oosterhof and Conrad (2008) instructors need to establish a collaborative tone through icebreakers, conduct in syllabus, and the ability to communicate socially.
    I have participated in PLC groups that have been unsuccessful due to the fact that no one’s opinion was respected, therefore, people were not open to participating because of the fear of being ridiculed when one’s opinion did not match with others. Learning from that experience, I am careful to structure guidelines within my own classroom to make sure that every students’ opinion is valued in a cooperative learning activity.

    • Chauna,

      First, thank you for responding.

      Second, I agree that without equal respect and cooperation within the entire group there will not be much success achieved.

      Third, how have your online group experiences compared to your face-to-face experiences?

      Blessings,
      Lynn

  4. Lynn,

    I really liked your post. It flowed well and was easy to understand the importance of the assignment with clear instructions on how to complete the assignment. Great job.

    Melissa

  5. Pingback: to become taller

  6. Pingback: raspberry ketone review

  7. Lynn,
    My collaborative learning is limited to our small band of building “elective” teachers and PLC meetings. I generally take the leadership role in the group, as I have the biggest mouth. Also, I have the ability to translate what ever it is we are being forced to implement, into something that is understood by non-math/English teachers. This group can be frustrating, as they like to complain a lot. We are usually in hurry up and write something down mode, so we can leave the meeting early. Most techniques that we try do not work, such as assigning each member a task to keep the meeting going. We tried GoogleDocs so we could visualize everyone’s contribution to the PLC, but eventually every just stopped logging in.

    In my online experience wikis have been a very valuable tool, as they show who is doing what work, and who is not doing what they were assigned to do. If it weren’t for the wiki, someone would have been given credit for work that they did not do.

  8. Pingback: DG2019M,http://pinterest.com/pin/141793088238443114/,http://pinterest.com/pin/141793088238443114/

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s